On the whole ‘Apple dropping Snow Leopard from support’ thing

512 Pixels:

Apple on Tuesday made it clear that it will no longer patch OS X 10.6, aka Snow Leopard, when it again declined to offer a security update for the four-and-a-half-year-old operating system.

As Apple issued an update for Mavericks, or OS X 10.9, as well as for its two predecessors, Mountain Lion (10.8) and Lion (10.7), Apple had nothing for Snow Leopard or its owners yesterday.

Keizer fails to mention that Snow Leopard wasn’t affected by Apple’s goto fail; bug, but hey, I’m not a security reporter.

Stephen Hackett sets the record straight on the retirement of Snow Leopard.

Parental Controls With iOS Restrictions

The Instructional:

The iPad has found immense popularity amongst young children, so it’s no surprise that it features some of the best parental controls of any computing platform. Unfortunately, these controls can be often overlooked, so it’s all to common to hear about instances where children have inadvertently generated huge charges within apps and games due to In-App Purchases for additional content or unlocking features.

Restrictions within iOS is a comprehensive feature designed to provide you with granular control about what can and cannot be viewed or accessed on an iPad, iPhone or iPod touch. For parents especially, this is the one feature you need to know about.

Every parent should know about the parental control options within iOS, especially when it comes to those with children playing games that use in-app purchases.

iCloud Photo Sharing With Shared Photo Streams

The Instructional:

For many users, iCloud’s Photo Stream is only ever used for its automatic upload and delivery of new photos across all of their iCloud-enabled devices. But Photo Stream offers far more, providing some excellent features that makes sharing photos with friends and family an enjoyable and more personal experience, especially when considered as an alternative to sharing via social networks.

If you’re still emailing photos back and forth or want something better than Facebook to share photos to friends and family with, iCloud might be the answer.

Apple’s Lemons

Stephen Hackett at 512 Pixels takes a trip down repressed memory lane:

While Macintosh hardware is considered some of the most reliable in the industry, the company has had some pretty epic failures in the past. We spoke about some of these a couple of weeks ago on The Prompt, but after doing some digging, I’ve tweaked and expanded the list.

This article isn’t comprehensive, and I’ve just ignored things like exploding iPod nanos and boring hardware failures. A couple are fairly modern, and a couple aren’t, but all of them are enough to make even the staunchest fanboy roll their eyes.

In short, these are my favorite runts of the Macintosh litter.

Gatekeeper Fundamentals

The Instructional:

As the Mac becomes ever more popular, it becomes increasingly targeted by potentially malicious apps. To offer additional protection against this, Apple introduced a security feature within Mountain Lion that helps prevent these unscrupulous apps from being launched, called Gatekeeper.

Although designed to be as simple as possible, Gatekeeper does include some options for further configuration.

First of a two-part series I’ve written over at The Instructional that provides a comprehensive overview of Gatekeeper.

Download All Current and Previous iOS and iPod Software Updates From Apple via shell script

I decided to publish a small shell script I wrote a while ago from my days needing to regularly access and download iOS and iPod software updates. It’s useful if you regularly restore and update iPods and iOS devices, need to jailbreak a device or just generally see what updates are available.

I would regularly need to ensure some MacBooks had all available iOS and iPod software updates so that no matter what device would be connected, we’d have the latest software. Having the older ones wasn’t as useful, but occasionally I’d need to restore an iPhone running iOS4.

The script will first output all available software update download URLs to a text file, allowing you to select the one you want to download. The script also contains download commands for both curl and wget if you want to download them all.

It’s available over on GitHub.

The Instructional is now available

As I’ve written about previously, I’ve been working on a new site to provide guides, workflows and tutorials for iOS and OS X.

I’m happy to announce that The Instructional went live a few minutes ago, along with two in-depth guides:

These aren’t your average guides, these have been written to be as detailed and in-depth, whilst as easy to follow, as possible. The Personal Hotspot guide, for example, doesn’t just cover using a cellular-enabled iOS device as a wireless hotspot, it explains how to connect via Bluetooth and USB.

I will be regularly publish guides that I hope iOS and OS X users will find interesting and enjoy.

In addition, I’ll occasionally include link-posts to some great guides and workflows that others have written, all with the purpose to provide The Instructional readers with a great selection of content to learn from.

The Instructional is sponsor and donation-supported, with monthly memberships coming soon for users who would like to regularly contribute to the continued running of the site.

There’s a full RSS feed (no annoying “Click here to read more”) and posts will be shared to both App.net and Twitter accounts.