Adding Webmentions to Jekyll

I've added some basic support for webmentions to my Jekyll-powered site using webmention.io and this Jekyll plugin. If any of my posts are mentioned elsewhere and my site receives a webmention, it's displayed below the post content.

Since Jekyll is a static site generator, the plugin can only check for new webmentions when the site is rebuilt. Netlify uses continuous deployment to keep my site up to date, so any time I commit a change and push it to Github, the site is automatically rebuilt and deployed. To supplement this, I also use IFTTT Webhooks to trigger a build every 24 hours, allowing my website to check for new webmentions on a daily basis.

Although the plugin is easy to install and use, I ran into a hiccup when trying to work on my site locally. I'd normally use the following command to serve the site as I work on it, allowing me to see changes reflected:

bundle exec jekyll serve --limit_post 50

This uses the development Jekyll environment by default, which overwrites site.url with http://localhost:4000 (instead of using https://www.jordanmerrick.com). The webmentions plugin then attempts to retrieve webmentions for posts under that URL, not my site's actual URL. As a result, no webmentions were being retrieved, so I couldn't test locally.

As a workaround, I discovered that I needed to set Jekyll's environment to production. This keeps site.url intact, allowing for webmentions to be properly retrieved:

JEKYLL_ENV=production bundle exec jekyll serve --limit_post 50

The plugin also supports sending webmentions, though I need to do a little more work to set that up. Outgoing webmentions is a separate command and not part of the build process. I do use a Digital Ocean instance for development, so I'm considering some sort of cronjob for handling outgoing webmentions.

iOS 12 public beta seems to be quite stable on my iPhone X and iPad mini 4. Should I go all-in and install it on my iPad Pro?

Reading a Six Colors post about automating charts and was reminded that I created a workflow almost three years ago for just this task. Hard to believe Workflow has been around that long, and amazing to see how far it's come.

Now that a third public beta of iOS 12 has just been released, time to install it on my iPhone!

I haven't used Instapaper in years, but going independent seems like a good move for them. Hopefully it all works out; companies that change owners every few years spend more time shifting gears than going forward. I'd hate to see Instapaper fade away completely.

I'm a huge fan of Nathan Fillion and the Uncharted video games series, so this fan film was a joy to watch. He is Nathan Drake!

My first Victory Royale in Fortnite on Nintendo Switch!

2018071512323600-F489C99A244DF57DCBDC4BFD2DB926F1

Always a good day when a visit to Blue Bottle occurs.

IMG_1633

I was an Apple retail employee (mostly a Mac Genius) from 2005-2011, and left seven years ago today. A lot has changed at Apple since then, but the stores still look and feel very much the same. This always makes me a little nostalgic when I visit one.

Some Initial Observations About Shortcuts

Apple started accepting requests to download the new Shortcuts app earlier today. I received an invite this afternoon and have spent about an hour using the app. Here are some of my initial thoughts.

  • The app may have some new functionality and a fresh coat of paint, but it's still very much the Workflow we know and love. The interface, how shortcuts (nΓ©e workflows) are created, and the actions available are basically the same.
  • I don't like how actions are listed. Shortcuts hides the groups of actions behind a set of suggested actions at first. To view all actions, you have to tap the Search field.
  • Shortcuts are run with just a single tap, not a double-tap. To view or edit a shortcut (or run it and see each action take place), tap β€’β€’β€’.
  • Unlike Workflow, Shortcuts doesn't show you each action step as it takes place. It hides this out of view, so a running shortcut doesn't have that visual distraction.
  • I didn't have any trouble adding some shortcuts to Siri. I was able to set a spoken phrase and run each of them without issue.
  • Siri Suggestions is an interesting feature. Based on your behavior, it offers a selection of actions that you've done before, such as view an article in Apple News or open an email you've recently read. These are actions you can't replicate in Shortcuts, but they're a bit limited in scope for the time being. I'm sure this will improve as time goes on.
  • There are several new system actions that can be used in Shortcuts:
    • Set Low Power Mode
    • Set do not disturb
    • Set Airplane Mode
    • Set Bluetooth
    • Set Cellular Data
    • Set Wi-Fi
  • There are also some new actions that provide some more functionality in iOS:
    • Run JavaScript on Safari Web Page
    • Markup
    • Show Result
    • Send and Request Payments
    • Share with iCloud Photo Sharing
  • Some third-party actions that Workflow supported seem to no longer be available:
    • Trigger IFTTT applet
    • Giphy
  • Some of my workflows no longer work, though exactly why is a bit of a mystery. Granted, these are really complex workflows, but they run fine in Workflow. I need to dig deeper into Shortcuts to see what might be causing it.

Much more functionality is expected to come in subsequent betas and, eventually, the final release of Shortcuts. I'm already impressed with this first beta, and I can't wait to see the finished product.

Update 2018-07-06: Restarting my iPad appears to have resolved the issue of some of my shortcuts not working.