Apple Removes Apps From Their Affiliate Program

Members of the iTunes Affiliate Program (myself included) received an email from Apple earlier today that announced iOS and Mac apps would no longer be included:

Thank you for participating in the affiliate program for apps. With the launch of the new App Store on both iOS and macOS and their increased methods of app discovery, we will be removing apps from the affiliate program. Starting on October 1st, 2018, commissions for iOS and Mac apps and in-app content will be removed from the program. All other content types (music, movies, books, and TV) remain in the affiliate program.

This stinks, especially as it comes less than 24 hours after Apple's earning call that announced yet another record quarter. Was that 7% rate really eating into their bottom line? I do find it interesting that the only content being dropped from the affiliate program is that which Apple takes a sizable cut of. iTunes Store and Books content remains, so why only apps? I can't help but think it's because Apple pay affiliates from their own 30% take, and they just don't want to do it anymore.

Federico Viticci describes the move as downright hostile and petty, and I completely agree with him. This decision is a shitty one on Apple's part, and it feels like it was made only with a balance sheet as consideration.

There are many great sites within the Apple community that contribute to app sales and adoption of Apple devices through app recommendations. This decision to end affiliate links hurts the very people who will have had a noticeable influence on the purchase of apps. Eli Hodapp over at Touch Arcade, one of the most popular iOS game sites, isn't even sure how the site can continue.

I can say with absolute certainty that the majority of apps I've purchased and enjoyed over the years have been through reviews and recommendations that used affiliate links. That's how I, and many others, discover new apps. I enjoy reading app reviews on MacStories or hearing recommendations in an episode of Mac Power Users. One of my worries is that we're going to see far fewer meaningful recommendations from the community. Sites like Touch Arcade are going to find it extremely difficult to survive, and other publications may no longer publish app recommendations at all.

Apple is one of the world's richest companies with billions of dollars in the bank. Dropping apps from the affiliate program after all these years just feels like a dick move.

Webmentions

  1. I think the death of Touch Arcade is exactly what Apple wants. They want their own App Store to be where people discover things. It sucks, but I’m guessing that’s their rationale.