My Favorite iOS Apps in 2017

2017 was the year I bid farewell to the Mac and went all in with iOS. Following the lead of Federico Viticci and Gabe Weatherhead, here's a selection of my favorite iOS apps of the past year.


Using Apollo (Free, $2.99 to unlock Pro features) on my iPhone X to browse Reddit is such a delight. It has an elegant design that feels uncluttered, and includes a ton of features and options. Despite all that, the app never feels bloated, complex, or clunky.

The app is clearly a labor of love by someone who frequently uses Reddit. There's a great community of users in /r/apolloapp, where the developer also discusses bugs, feature requests, and what's to come in later versions.

The iPad experience does need some improvement, though the developer has plans to overhaul this experience as part of version 2.

Apple Notes

Notes continues to be my preferred note-taking app. I've used many different apps and services over the years, from Evernote to Bear, but I just keep coming back to Notes for it's simplicity and stability.

It's a great example of an app and service that "just works". Syncing is always rock-solid and fast, with changes immediate reflected across all my devices. The improved Share Sheet in iOS 11 has made it even easier for me to quickly capture thoughts or pieces of information.

There isn't much I need from a note-taking app, and Apple Notes fits the bill.


I don't have the time to listen to every episode of the podcasts I'm subscribed to. The rather unique approach Castro ($1.99) takes to podcast management is one I truly appreciate—and why it's my favorite podcast app.

Instead of adding new episodes to a play queue automatically, they're placed into an Inbox to triage first. I can then take a look at each episode and decide if I want to add it to the queue. This is especially useful for managing shows with daily episodes that aren't required listening. For some of my must-listen shows, I have Castro skip the inbox and add them to the queue directly.


I've owned Coda ($24.99) ever since it was released, but it became one of my most frequently used apps this year. With it, I'm able to use my iPad for web development.

Coda is really three apps in one: a text editor, SSH client, and file manager. Any time I need to make a change to my site that requires editing code, I can connect to my development server using Coda and make the necessary changes.

Since I have full command-line access to that server using Coda's SSH client, I can start an instance of Jekyll and test the changes I've made. If everything looks good, I use git commands to commit the changes and push them to GitHub.

Unfortunately, the future of Coda isn't clear. Earlier this year, Panic published a retrospective of 2016 and highlighted that the company has struggled to make their iOS apps profitable. I'm optimistic about its future though—if anyone can figure it out, it's Panic.


I started using mind maps earlier this year, and MindNode (Free, $14.99 to unlock all features) is my app of choice. I can quickly hide the interface and create a distraction-free environment as I'm writing down my thoughts, and there are a wide range of formatting options to style and structure the resulting mind map.

MindNode's support for iOS 11 allows you to open and save mind maps anywhere that's supported by Files. Mind maps can also be exported into a variety of formats. The app even integrates with Reminders and can sync tasks and completion status.


I used to be a Things user back in the day, but the lack of custom timed alerts on tasks drove me to 2Do. But after recently giving Things 3 for iPhone ($9.99) a try, I immediately switched over.

The app itself is stunningly beautiful. It feels more laid back than most other task management systems, yet still has a lot of the same functionality you'll find elsewhere. There's no friction between me and the tasks I create or need to accomplish, and even the task list view shows only the most important information.

It's not as feature-rich as 2Do but, like Apple Notes, it does everything I need, and even includes a decent Apple Watch app and Siri integration. I also use Things 3 for iPad ($19.99), which is available as a separate purchase.

Working Copy

Working Copy (Free, $14.99 to unlock all features) is one of my all-time favorite apps. For those unfamiliar with it, it's a fully functional Git client for iOS that seamlessly integrates with services like GitHub and GitLab.

Working Copy is an integral part of the process to manage and update this site. Any changes I make (e.g., new blog post) are committed and pushed to GitHub, after which Netlify regenerate's the site and deploys the changes automatically. I also use the app to manage the Workflow Directory repository on GitHub.

Working Copy is one of the best GUIs for Git I've ever used. Without it, I doubt I'd be using my iPad in the way I do today.