Qi Wireless Chargers

Now that my wife and I have both upgraded to iPhone X, I've replaced some of our iPhone docks with Qi wireless chargers. I was curious to see how different chargers compare, so I bought three different models:

Qi chargers

Each charger is WPC compliant, does the same basic job of wirelessly charging a device1, and is priced under $25.

A common complaint about wireless chargers is that a power adapter isn't always provided, just a USB cable. Honestly, I'm fine with that. I have a drawer full of unused USB power adapters and I'm sure most people buying these types of chargers do as well. All of these unused adapters will eventually end up as electronic waste on a landfill somewhere, so I'd much rather use one of the many spares I have.

Samsung

The Samsung charger is currently the top pick over at The Wirecutter. It looks good in comparison to most of the chargers available and, unsurprisingly, has the best build quality of the three. It's also the only one that came with a USB power adapter. We're using this in our living room as a communal charger.

There is an LED light at the front that glows blue when a phone is on charge and there's no way to turn it off. The Wirecutter reports that it's probably a dealbreaker for use anywhere other than a desk, something Stephen Hackett agrees with. I don't find the light to be particularly bright but if this is something that would disturb your sleep, you may want to skip it as a nightstand charger.

Yoobao

The Yoobao is noticeably smaller than the other two. It actually seems almost too small when used with something like iPhone X. It's stable enough and the grip keeps the phone in place, but I wouldn't recommend it for iPhone 8 Plus owners. I use this charger on my nightstand.

The finish is inferior to the Samsung charger and the plastic material feels rather cheap. There is an LED light that's permanently illuminated which changes color from red to blue when a phone is on charge. It's very bright but focused, so as long as you point it away from you on a nightstand or cover it with a small piece of electrical tape, it won't be a disturbance.

CHOETECH

The CHOETECH charger is bigger than both the Yoobao and Samsung models. It does feels really cheap because it's quite large and light, but the build quality is pretty good and on par with the Yoobao. Like the Yoobao, it also has a bright but focused LED so you can simply point the charger away from you on a nightstand.

The grip on top (the gray wireless symbol) is pretty disappointing. While it does keep the phone in place, it's raised and has very little surface area in contact with the phone. This causes it to have a slight wobble. I'm not sure why the manufacturer thought this was a good idea because the actual surface is also rubberized, so there's no need for such a raised grip.

The blue version of this charger, however, doesn't have this problem as the wireless symbol appears to be inset, not raised. If you are considering this charger and don't mind the color, you may want to go for that one instead.

Final thoughts

Each of the chargers works exactly as intended and can charge through Apple silicone cases, so I don't feel compelled to return them to Amazon. I plan on ordering a fourth for the car, but will test each of these at the weekend first to see which works best.

If you're an iPhone 8 or iPhone X owner and on the fence about wireless charging, I suggest giving it a try. For $25, it's practically the same price as a Lightning cable from Apple and you'll likely find the convenience worth it.

It's worth mentioning that there really aren't any good looking chargers, just ones that aren't as ugly as others. Even the Samsung charger isn't that pretty, it just looks much better than the competition. As adoption among iPhone users increases, we'll hopefully see an improvement in the design of chargers.

  1. Unlike the other two, the Yoobao charger does support fast charging though it's not currently supported on the iPhone. A future iOS update will supposedly enable support for this.